Volkswagen has revealed how the latest digital tools are playing a vital role in its development of the ID. R electric race car.

Volkswagen has put a spotlight on how computer simulation is playing a key role in the development of its ID. R electric race car, as the company continues to prepare the prototype for a record-breaking attempt later this year.

Volkswagen ID. R development front side 2

Romain Dumas is taking to the wheel of the car to try and set a lap record for electric vehicles at Nurburgring-Nordschleife in the summer, but before then work is continuing to ensure all aspects of preparation have been covered.

While that includes test drives and wind tunnel work, another aspect is the use of digital tools and a virtual cockpit. Known as Driver in the Loop, the latter system records anything that Dumas inputs and then builds upon it in the offline driving dynamics simulation.

Volkswagen ID. R development front side 1

This then means simulations can consider how different power outputs of motors or even shifts in the vehicle’s centre of gravity can affect the lap time. The aim is to simply optimise the car’s handling and improve motor responsiveness.

Volkswagen Motorsport said the use of such tools helped to save time, costs and ultimately provide vital support to engineers.

Volkswagen ID. R development rear side 1

Dr Benjamin Ahrenholz, head of calculation and simulation at Volkswagen Motorsport, said: “With regard to the Nürburgring-Nordschleife, we are in the fortunate position of being in possession of a wealth of data on the track layout and road surface.

“This allows us to adapt the ID. R virtually as efficiently as possible, despite the fact it has never driven a lap of the Nordschleife before.”

Volkswagen ID. R - Romain Dumas

Romain Dumas is also preparing for another big challenge in the ID. R later this year, as Volkswagen also recently confirmed he would be looking to set a record on the Tianmen Shan Big Gate Road in China. The gruelling stretch features 99 corners and a climb of 1,200 metres.

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