The Institute of Advanced Motorists (IAM) has published findings highlighting overwhelming support for the government's move to introduce a new criminal offence for dangerous drivers.

According to the group's findings, 94 per cent of Brits back the introduction of the new offence of 'causing serious injury by dangerous driving', which came into force earlier this year.

The new crime will be applicable to drivers who cause serious injury through their reckless driving and will look to extend the scope and severity of punishments for this group.

Overall, the IAM's research showed the greatest deterrents to poor driving habits in the UK are enforcement (70 per cent), while consequences of their actions (48 per cent) and the severity of punishment (43 per cent) also ranked highly among respondents.

IAM chief executive Simon Best said: "It may seem shocking that enforcement is a greater deterrent to poor driving than the risk of causing death of injury, but just as seeing police on the beat reduces crime, highly-visible traffic cops reduce bad driving. Therefore any change in law needs to be supported by well-resourced enforcement on our roads."

He added that people are now keen to see tougher penalties for those who flout the law by driving dangerously.

The new offence came into force on May 1st when the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders (LASPO) Act 2012 received royal assent.

Last week, motoring safety charity Brake announced the launch of a new campaign to encourage motorists to cut their speed this summer.

Ellen Booth, Brake's senior campaigns officer, argued more children will be playing outdoors and near roads during the coming months and therefore it is up to drivers to remain vigilant when behind the wheel at all times and to reduce their speed in order to improve safety for all.

Convicted drivers can contact Performance Direct for all insurance advice. We insure many convicted drivers across the UK and can save you time and money.

Posted by Jack Smith

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