New proposals have been put forward by the Department for Transport (DfT) to crack down on drink-driving in the UK.

The DfT has set out a range of new measures that it hopes will help to make the UK's roads a safer place in the future, including the scrapping of individual's rights to refuse a breathalyser test in favour of a blood or urine test.

In some cases, drivers who have been drinking attempt to use delaying tactics to postpone their testing and this is something the government is keen to see disappear.

Furthermore, the DfT announcement includes provision for the training of more healthcare professionals in the handling of alcohol and drug tests to ensure there is always a qualified individual available to run this analysis is required.

Finally, stronger deterrents, including vehicle forfeiture for repeat and dangerous offenders, are now on the cards.

Director of policy and research at the Institute of Advanced Motorists Neil Greig argued all of the above measures should be welcomed, as drink-driving is a blight on the country and should be eradicated.

Mr Greig said: "Drivers need to know about the devastating consequences of drink-driving and drink-drivers need to know that they will be caught and punished."

However, he claimed education could hold the key to tackling the problem in the long term, and as such, he advised advertisements highlighting the consequences of drink-driving be run throughout the year, not solely during the festive period.

"Last year, 280 people died ruining the lives of families up and down the country so more needs to be done to eradicate this menace," road safety minister Stephen Hammond argued when announcing the new DfT measures.

"That is why we are taking forward a package of measures to streamline enforcement against drink-driving."

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Posted by Jack Smith

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